Monday, February 27, 2017

Video: Searching for the Perfect Shot with Wildlife Photographer Michel d’Oultremont

What does it take for a photographer to get the perfect wildlife shot? Patience. Lots and lots of patience. In this video we head out into the wilderness with wildlife photographer Michel d’Oultremont of Belgium. He sometimes spends days at a time in the wild hoping to get that elusive image that no one else has seen before. It is often frustrating, demanding, and even boring work, but that moment where his patience finally pays off can be exhilarating and extremely fulfilling. 

Video: Meet the 12 Year Old Climber Who Has Set His Sights on the Seven Summits

Meet Tyler Armstrong, a 12-year old alpinist who is attempting to climb all of the Seven Summits. Tyler has already topped out on Aconcagua, Kilimanjaro, and Elbrus, and had hoped to attempt Everest this spring. But, the Nepali government denied him a permit based on his age, so he has set his sights elsewhere. In this video, you'll get a chance to see Tyler in his element as he trains on Denali in Alaska, a mountain that he hopes to summit later this year. We've written about Tyler before but it's nice to get an update on his progress and see the young man in action. I think you'll find he's a competent, focused, and experienced climber who will impress you with his focus and determination.

Gear Closet: Vasque Lost 40 Insulated Boots

February is an odd time of the year. We're still firmly locked into winter, and yet we can still catch glimpses of spring on the horizon from time to time as well. Despite those flirtations with warmer weather, it is far too early to put away our winter gear of course, keeping our down jackets, outer shells, base layers and other clothing close at hand. That includes winter boots that can keep our feet warm and dry, even when playing in the snow.

Recently, I've had a chance to test out a comfortable new pair of boots that certainly excel in that area. The Vasque Lost 40 is a mukluk style of boot that feature a classic look that is intermixed exquisitely well with lots of modern technology. The restful is a unique pair of boots that feel amazing on your feet and perform well in the winter.

The Lost 40 use a waterproof suede and soft-shell uppers to create a boot that is surprisingly supple. In fact, when you first see them, you'll probably question whether or not they'll actually be able to keep your feet warm and dry in inclement conditions. But, I've found that they perform exceptionally well, in all but the most west conditions. In fact, they are built to play outside in the winter weather, and my pair of boots didn't get overly damp inside in any way, even after hours outside.

The soft feel of these boots carries over to the interior as well. On your feet, they feel amazing comfortable. So much so that I didn't really feel the need to take them off, even after a few long hikes. The Lost 40 feel like an insulated slipper that can keep your feet warm, even while playing outdoors for one extended period of time in sub-zero conditions. And because they are extremely flexible, they are comfortable enough to wear around town, hiking a trail, snowshoeing in the backcountry, and more. They are not overly technical however, so don't expect to slap a pair of crampons on them and have them perform the same way as a more traditional boot.

Popular Mechanics Shares the 10 Greatest Wildernesses in the World

Looking to truly get away for awhile? Than perhaps Popular Mechanics can help. The site has published an interesting article that names the 10 greatest wildernesses on the planet, giving us some suggestions on where to go on our next adventure to places that few other people ever get to see.

Some of the destination on the list are classic adventure spots. For instance, both Patagonia and Antarctica make the cut for obvious reasons. Other places on the PM top ten aren't quite so familiar however, which makes them all the more intriguing. For instance, Bouvet Island in the Atlantic Ocean is considered the most remote island in the world, while Annamite Range of mountains in Vietnam are lauded for their inaccessibility as well. Some of the places on the list are a bit too remote however, as I doubt too many of us will ever see the Mariana Trench for instance.

Still, this is a fun list to look at and dream about. The majority of the destinations are certainly within the reach of most of us, given some time, planning, and money. In fact, I've actually been to a few of the places on this list already, and I have no doubt that more than a few of you have been as well. But if you're looking for some ideas on where to go on your next adventure, this isn't a bad place to start.

Read the entire story here.

Winter Climbs 2017: Alex Txikon Back in Everest Base Camp

Spanish climber Alex Txikon hasn't given up on his dream of a winter summit of Everest without supplemental oxygen. After spending more than a week back in Kathmandu, he and his team have returned to the mountain and are now getting ready to make another attempt at the summit. The squad is well rested and ready to go, but now as March approaches the clock is truly ticking. 

In a blog post on his website, Alex says that he and his teammates took a helicopter from the Nepali capital back to EBC on Saturday. The climbers went from an altitude of less than 1000 meters (3280 ft) in Kathmandu to 5250 meters (17,225 ft) in Base Camp in about an hour's time. Thankfully, they are already well acclimated after weeks on the mountain so there wasn't much of an adjustment upon their return. 

The team has spent the past couple of days repairing their route through the Khumbu Icefall in preparation for their next summit push. That has allowed them to get back into the flow of moving on the mountain, and the route had fallen into disrepair while they were away in Kathmandu. The constant shifting of the ice in the icefall causes the ropes and ladders found there to shift or even collapse, but once the route is reestablished, they'll start thinking about the next move. 

The forecast looks promising in the days ahead, but it is unclear at this point when an actually attempt on the summit will begin. Once a path through the icefall is created, the team will be free to begin moving back up the mountain, but they'll still need to keep an eye on the weather to ensure they have a real shot at topping out. The next summit bid is likely to be the last, so careful strategy and planning is required. 

We'll keep an eye on the team's progress and post updates in the days ahead. It shouldn't be long now until the definitive summit push gets underway. 

Friday, February 24, 2017

Video: A Red Octopus Takes on a Swimmer Crab – with a Surprise Ending

This clip has been making the round on the Internet for the past week, but I thought it was worth sharing for anyone who hasn't seen it yet. It was shot by a couple of divers who watched an epic clash between a red octopus and a swimmer crab on the bottom of the ocean, with the octopus being very aggressive. But just before you think you know what is about to happen, nature intervenes in an unexpected way.

Video: Mongolia's Eagle Hunters in a Modern World

Have 15 minutes to spare and want to see a unique way of life from a remote corner of the globe? This video is a short documentary bout the eagle hunters of Mongolia, a group of nomads who have lived in basically the same fashion for hundreds of years. But now, their numbers are dwindling, and modern life is starting to creep in on their corner of the world. How much longer will they continue to hunt and live in this fashion? Watch the video to find out more about these amazing people.

Last year when I was in Mongolia I had the chance to meet one of these extraordinary men. It was one of the highlights of an amazing trip and it is sad to think that these traditions may vanish.

Arctic 2017: The Gear for Skiing to the North Pole

Have you ever wondered what gear is required to ski to the North Pole? How does it vary from what you need when you go to the South Pole instead? That's the subject of an interesting article over at ExWeb, which is examining the equipment needed to ski through the Arctic ahead of the start of the expedition season there. 

To find out just what gear is needed, ExWeb reached out to veteran polar explorer Dixie Dansercoer, who has visited the North and South Pole on more than 30 occasions throughout his illustrious career.  One of those expeditions was – at the time – the longest non-motorized journey across the Antarctic, when he traveled by kite-ski across the frozen continent back in 2012. In other words, if anyone knows a thing or two about traveling in the cold regions of our planet, it's Dixie.

Dansercoer shares his five favorite pieces of gear for going to the North Pole with ExWeb, listing such items as his drysuit (an essential piece of equipment when heading north), safety items, gear for more efficient cooking, and a set of customized trekking poles. Other gear that Arctic explorers take with them include inflatable rafts for crossing the open sections of the ocean and a shotgun to scare away the polar bears, something that isn't necessary in the Antarctic. 

Additionally, Dixie shares some of his experiences with kiting to the South Pole and beyond, offering some insights in that area as well. This year, both Mike Horn and Johanna Davidson made extensive use of kites during their expeditions, with Horn breaking Dansercoer's longest distance record in the process.

As we get ready for the start of the Arctic season, these interviews and stories help us to understand what the teams will be facing when they begin their journey. It will be an incredibly difficult expedition to say the least, and the odds are stacked against them for being successful. Still, we'll be watching and following along closely, hoping for success. The season should get underway next week, weather permitting. Stay tuned for more. 

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Off to Denver!

Another quick note to let regular readers know that I'm off to Denver for a couple of days on assignment once again. That means either no updates or limited posts for the next few days, although once again I'll be keeping an eye on a couple of stories to see how they develop and will post news if it is warranted.

Most notably, I'll be continuing to watch the progress of Alex Txikon on Everest as he prepares to return to Base Camp and continue his attempt at a winter ascent of the mountain. The Spanish mountaineer is currently in Kathmandu, but should be headed back to BC any day now. He and his team are rested, acclimatized, and ready to make a final summit push. Right now, all they need is some good weather, which may still be a few days off. Still, we'll keep an eye on things and update his progress if anything changes.

In the meantime, I'll be back soon with more adventure and travel news.

Video: Elephant Chases Visitors For Miles in Kruger National Park

South Africa's Kruger National Park is one of the most iconic safari destinations on the planet, allowing visitors to get up close and personal with some of the most spectacular wildlife imaginable. But recently, a group of tourists found out first hand just how close they can get when a bull elephant decided to chase their safari vehicle for several miles. The massive creature didn't take too kindly to the travelers being there and expressed his feelings quite plainly. I had a similar experience while I was in Kruger a few years back too. The elephants there are very large and quite aggressive, with one chasing our vehicle as well. This can certainly be scary when you're in the moment, so take my advice and avoid the situation altogether. Just watch this video instead.

Video: Footage of the Massive Crack in the Larsen Ice Shelf

If you've read this blog with any regularity over the past couple of months, you've seen me post several disturbing stories about how climate change is starting to have an impact on the Antarctic, including a recent article about a massive crack on the Larsen Ice Shelf that is spreading at an alarming rate. Today, we have video footage of that giant rift courtesy of the British Antarctic Survey. The clip was shot while flying over the crack a few weeks back, and it gives us a bird's eye view of just how large it truly is. In a manner of months, the crack is expected to reach all the way across the ice shelf, at which time it will collapse under its own massive weight, creating what could potentially be the largest ice berg of all time. It will also allow the glacier that is trapped behind it to tumble unfettered into the Southern Ocean, potentially causing rising ocean levels around the world.

Backpacker Lists 12 Big Hiking Adventures for 2017

We are almost two months into 2017 already, and I'm sure by now many of you have already made plans for your adventures for the year ahead. But, if you're still looking for a few suggestions, Backpacker magazine is here to help. In a recently published article, the mag suggests 12 big adventures for the year ahead.

This being Backpacker the list contains lots of places that you can visit and explore on foot. Each of the destinations also comes with an estimated cost, so you can get an idea of how much you might have to spend to undertake these excursions. Some of the suggestions that made the list include hiking the Grand Staircase - Escalandte National Monument in Utah, which comes with an estimated cost of $500.

That turns out to be the only adventure set in the U.S., as all of the rest take place in countries like Canada, Peru. Chile, Nepal, New Zealand, and other great adventure destinations. For instance, Backpacker also suggests hiking the Jungrrau Region of Switzerland ($1500) and the An Teallach Traverse in Scotland ($1100).

None of these suggested adventures are particularly expensive. The most costly is a $4000 trek through the Amphu Lapcha Pass in Nepal. Most are under $2000, with a couple trips priced at less than $1000.

All in all, this is a great list for those who like to hike, trek, or backpack their way through some amazing landscapes. And since 2017 is really just getting started, there is still plenty of time to get a few of these options on your list before the end of the year. Personally, there are at least four or five of these trips that I'd love to do, but I'll just continue adding them to my never-ending bucket list.

Arctic 2017: North Pole Teams Heading to Resolute Bay in Canada

We're on the brink of the start of the 2017 Arctic expedition season, with the planned departure of the two teams heading to the North Pole scheduled for next week. Those teams are now en route to their starting point in Canada, although as usual, their start dates will depend entirely on the weather. 

One of those teams is made up of Sebastian Copeland and Mark George, who have collectively called their expedition The Last Great March. According to the latest update from Copeland, the two men are setting out today for Resolute Bay in Canada, where they will first spend a few days sorting their gear and preparing for their departure, ahead of the a scheduled flight out to their starting point sometime next week. With any luck, they'll be in Resolute by tomorrow and have a bit of time to rest up and get their sleds packed ahead of the launch of the expedition. 

The other team that plans to travel the full distance to the North Pole this year is Martin Murray and this canine companion Sky. In an audio dispatch released last week, Murray says his sled is packed and his gear is ready to go and he'll leave for Resolute Bay on Friday of this week. His gear load tips the scales at 104 kg (229 pounds) and he expects to be out on the ice in the first week of March. 

Both teams will share the same pilot and plane, as it is now very difficult to find anyone who will fly support in the Arctic. A few years back, Kenn Borek Air pulled out of that duty, leaving North Pole teams scrambling to find anyone else who will take them. This year, that pilot is Dave Mathieson, who is an extremely experienced pilot who has flown all over the world. Mathieson will stay on standby in Resolute for 60 days in case either squad needs an emergency pick-up, which is highly likely considering the conditions they'll face as they head north. 

The current departure plan is to fly out to their starting point sometime after February 27. If the weather is good, they could head out as early as Tuesday of next week, but they'll watch the forecast very closely before deciding when to go. Their exact starting point isn't set yet either, as conditions will dictate that as well. But the plan is to either start at Ward Hunt Island or Cape Discovery, with Mathieson having the final say as to where he can safely land to drop them off. 

Of course, we'll be following the two expeditions closely as they head to the North Pole. As usual, it should be very interesting to follow their progress. Remember, no one has completed the full distance journey to the North Pole since 2014, and the Arctic has only gotten more unstable ever since. Good luck to Sebastian, Mark, Martin, and Sky as they set off on this perilous journey. 

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Video: Climbers on the Summit Approach to Everest

The view from the top of the world is not one that many of us will ever get to see, but if you've ever wondered what it is like on the approach to the summit of Everest, you'll want to take a peek at this video. It's obviously not from the mountain in 2017 as the label says, but it still gives you a good idea of what it is like to finally reach the top.

Video: Chaco Presents: The Time Travelers - Chasing a Speed Record in the Grand Canyon

A few weeks back I posted a story about a team of paddlers who attempted to set a speed record for rowing down the length of the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon. They ultimately came up a bit short do to mechanical issues, but the effort was nevertheless amazing. Now, a documentary of the team's journey is in the works and we have a trailer for that film. As you'll see, this was quite an undertaking as the short clip gives us a brief glimpse of what to expect when the full-length film is released down the line.

Nat Geo Lists 9 Oscar-Nominated Films to Inspire Adventure

If you're a movie buff like I am, you probably already know that the Academy Awards show takes place this weekend, with golden statues being handed out to the best actor, actress, director, film, and so on. While many of us will be tuning in on Sunday night to see who takes top honors (the odds favor La La Land), others will no doubt be wondering what all of the hoopla is about, and why I'm even talking about it on The Adventure Blog in the first place. Well, the truth is, great films can inspire us in many ways, including sending us off on amazing journeys and seeking real-life adventures of our own. As a kid, I longed to visit some of the far flung places that my favorite actors were traversing through on the big screen, and when I got older I've managed to see some of those locations myself. Now, as we prepare for the Oscars to be handed out this weekend, National Geographic has posted a list of nine films that have received Academy Award nominations that will inspire you to go on an adventure as well.

Some of the places that make the list don't seem particularly adventurous. For instance, the aforementioned La La Land takes place in Los Angeles, while Danzel Washington's Fences is set in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Of course, those places still have a lot to offer visitors in terms of culture, history, food, drinks, and even outdoor attractions too. But, some of the other destinations on the list may feed your need for adventure better. For instance, the locations used for shooting the movie Arrival are found near Bozeman, Montana; one of my favorite places on the planet. Similarly, the critically acclaimed Hell or High Water takes place in West Texas, not far from the spectacular, but seldom visited, Big Bend National Park.

As usual with a list of this kind, I won't spoil all of the entires. Needless to say, they offer some interesting places to visit for those who like to travel. In some cases, watching the films alone will inspire you to want to go there. La La Land is lauded for being a visual love letter to LA for instance.

Every one of the films on Nat Geo's list are from this year's crop of Oscar contenders. But, it would also be fun to put together a similar list of classic films from the past as well. For instance, Lawrence of Arabia served as the inspiration for me to visit Jordan, while Raiders of the Lost Ark sparked an interest in Egypt as well. Seeing Rick wander the streets of Casablanca in the film of the same name will certainly lure fans of that movie to Morocco, while Out of Africa is a good way to convince anyone that going on safari might be a good idea.

What are the films that have inspired you to see various parts of the world? What movies have you intrigued about some place you haven't gone yet? Share your thoughts in the comments!

Climb Everest in Virtual Reality on the Oculus Rift

Let's face it, most of us are never going to be able to climb Everest. Not only is it extremely difficult, requiring years of experience and training, it also happens to be prohibitively expensive too. But, thanks to the miracles of modern technology, we can now all catch a glimpse of what it is like to stand on the highest point on the planet.

A company called Sólfar Studios, working in conjunction with another firm called RVX, have created a virtual reality experience that allows owners of the Oculus Rift VR headset to climb to the summit of Everest. The software offers Oculus owners a chance to take in the views from the mountain, without actually having to travel to the Himalaya or acclimatize for three weeks before starting up.

The new Everest VR experience is actually an updated version of one that Sólfar created for the HTC Vive headset last year. But, Oculus users get a couple of additional features, including the ability to climb up the Lhotse Face and a new "god" mode that takes them above the Himalaya themselves for a bird's eye view of the tallest mountains on Earth.

I don't own either of these VR headsets so I can't comment on what this virtual climb of Everest is like, but having used the Oculus Rift in the past, I can tell you that it provides a very compelling and realistic experience. We do get a glimpse of the technology at work here in the video below however, which is no substitute for actual VR, but it does serve as a preview of what to expect. This is especially true if your browser supports 360º video, allowing you to pan around in all directions. Check it out to catch a glimpse of this tech in action.

Ueli Steck Training in Nepal Ahead of Spring Everest-Lhotse Attempt

The spring climbing season in the Himalaya is still well over a month from getting under way, but already some of the world's top climbers are preparing for the challenges ahead. Take Swiss alpinist Ueli Steck, who is getting ready for what could be the most difficult undertaking of his illustrious career. And to prepare for that expedition, Ueli is already in Nepal and training for what he expects to be a major undertaking.

This spring, Ueli hopes to summit not only Everest, but its neighbor Lhotse as well. While it is a bit unusual to bag both summits in a single season, it's not completely unheard of with other mountaineers completing that challenging in the past. But, Ueli will attempt to nab both summits in a single go, first topping out on Everest before returning to Camp 4 for a brief rest, and traversing the narrow ride that connects the two mountains, and going straight for the summit of Lhotse as well.

Steck will be joined on this venture by climbing partner Tenji Sherpa, and to prepare for their expedition the duo have already been training in Nepal. Ueli and Tenji recently summited the 6180 meter (20,275 ft) Island Peak. Additionally, while training in the Khumbu Valley, Ueli has also been doing a lot of running, saying that he has covered a distance of 150 km (93 miles) and a vertical climb of around 12,000 meters (39,370 ft).

After spending three weeks in the Khumbu, Ueli will now head home for another three weeks of training in the Alps, before returning to Nepal to attempt the Everest-Lhotse traverse. My guess is that he'll be back in the country early in the season, do some more acclimatization in the valley ahead of the start of climbing season, and will be ready to take on the challenge as early as he can. We've seen Ueli dash up to the summit of Everest before, staying well ahead of the normal crowds, and he is likely to do that again. In fact, a few years back he was amongst the first to summit, following behind the rope fixing team as they installed the lines to the top. I wouldn't be shocked to see him do the same thing again in an attempt to avoid the crowds that would surely slow him down from his normal amazing pace.

It won't be long now and we'll begin to see more stories of training and final prep work for the start of the season. By the first of April, the teams will begin arriving in Kathmandu and things will get really interesting. Right now, it's the calm before the storm, and we still have a winter ascent of Everest to watch closely too.

Monday, February 20, 2017

Video: Take A Wild Ride on the GoPro Winning Mountain Bike Line of 2016

At the end of 2016, GoPro invited mountain bikers from across the globe to share their favorite rides from the past year, promising to pick a winner for their favorite line. The winner, which can be viewed below, was submitted by Stevey Storey and was filmed as he bombed down a trail in British Columbia. This first person ride is fast and wild with a little bit of everything, including narrow, twisty singletrack; obstacles to avoid, and even places to catch some air. This is pretty much a dream trail for most mountain bikers, so sit back and enjoy.

Video: How the U.S. National Parks Are Attempting to Lure More Minority Visitors

The national parks in the U.S. are some of the most dramatic and breathtaking landscapes found anywhere on the planet, and as such they draw millions of visitors each year. Unfortunately, most of those visitors are white, with few minorities sprinkled in here and there. But the Park Service and its partners are trying to change that by creating a more inclusive atmosphere for everyone. In this video, we see how those efforts are being conducted with the hopes of getting more people of color to experience the outdoors as well.


Gear Closet: Garmont 9.81 Speed III Light Hiking Shoes

Looking for some new hiking shoes as spring starts to inch a bit closer? Looking for something lightweight, but stable, that can offer plenty of protection for your feet? If so, then the Garmont 9.81 Speed III hiking shoe just might be what you're looking for. Recently, I've had the chance to give these shoes a go, and now find myself wearing them almost daily. Although, I wasn't sure that would be the case when I first put them on.

While I had met with Garmont over the past couple of summer Outdoor Retailer shows, this was the first time I'd actually gotten the chance to test a pair of their shoes. I always liked the style and design the company's boots displayed, but good looks don't always translate into a comfortable fit. Still, I was very intrigued with what I saw, and was eager to put them to the test. So, when my test pair of the 9.81 Speed III arrived, I eagerly put them on to get a feel for what they were actually like.

I was immediately impressed with how good they felt on my feet. The polymer heel inserts and EVA midsole gave the shoe a stiff – but comfortable – ride that offered a solid level of protection without much bulk. The wide toe-box was great too, especially when wearing a thicker sock, while the mesh upper was durable and breathable at the same time. The 9.81 Speed III felt a bit like a nice cross-over shoe, straddling the line between a trail runner and a light hiker. For my money, that's not a bad space to fill.

But then, I started to walk around in them and my perception of the shoes soon changed. You see, while I really liked they way they looked and felt, as I wore them around the house and while taking the dog for a walk, I started to notice that the shoes were rubbing against my ankle, creating a bit of a hot spot. I soldiered through, keeping them on my feet for a few hours, before giving up and reverting to something in my closet that wasn't causing me pain.

Three Trekkers to Walk the Length of the Great Himalaya Trail

Three trekkers are about to embark on a serious adventure that will take them across the length of Nepal, walking through the highest mountains on the planet as they go. Next weekend, the trio will set out on a journey led by World Expeditions that will see them hiking the entire length of the Great Himalaya Trail, covering more than 1700 km (1056 miles) as they go.

Made up of a number of smaller trails that have been intertwined, the GHT allows hikers to walk through the highest mountain range on the planet as they traverse Nepal from end to end. The trek is expected to take 152 days to complete, starting on February 26 and ending on July 27 of this year. The hike begins in eastern Nepal in the shadow of Kangchenjunga, and ends in the far western region of the country. Along the way, hikers will pass all eight of Nepal's 8000-meter peaks, including Everest itself.

During the trek, the hikers will stay in small mountain villages or camp along the route. They'll be greeted by locals, many of which don't see visitors all that often. The trail will take them deep into the heart of the Himalaya, to some of the most remote and wild places on the planet, with sweeping vistas, deep ravines, and beautiful peaks abound.

Walking the length of the GHT is a dream trek for many, and so far it hasn't been accomplished by too many travelers. But, World Expeditions has been supporting this trek for six years now, making it a reality for those who have the time and interest to do it themselves. If you're interested in making the hike they can help you sort out the logistics and get you on the trail. You'll find the full details on the company's Great Himalayan Trail trekking page, with info on how you can join next year's edition of this hike.

For me, this would be one of those top bucket-list journeys that I'd love to take at some point. It would be a fantastic trip through one of my favorite parts of the world. 152 days on the trial is a long time, but the experiences you would have along the way would certainly be life changing. The GHT can be hiked independently of course, but there are still some logistical challenges to overcome. Having someone help iron those out would make everything go a bit smoother.

Winter Climbs 2017: Everest Expedition Back in Kathmandu, Vow to Return to Base Camp

It has been a strange and turbulent week for Alex Txikon and his climbing partners. This time last week, the Spaniard, along with Nurbu and Chhepal Sherpa, were waiting for weather window to open to make a push to the summit. But when good conditions failed to materialize, they found themselves retreating to Base Camp to escape brutal winds and cold temperatures. But on the descent, Chhepal was injured by a falling rock, which forced the entire team back to Kathmandu, with the expedition apparently coming to an end. But Alex has vowed to return and says that his dance with Everest is not over just yet.

The unexpected return to the Nepali capital came about when news of Chhepal's injury reached the owners of Seven Summits Treks. Fearing for the safety of its employees, the entire squad was recalled to Kathmandu via helicopter, with Alex going with them. Once there, it seems there was a disagreement with how to proceed – or whether or not to continue with the winter attempt on Everest at all. But Alex says on his Facebook page that they are all preparing to return, and that his business has not yet been concluded. 

The most recent update indicates that the team is still in Kathmandu, but that they intend to return to Base Camp very soon. Exactly when they'll arrive back in BC remains to be seen, but the forecast does not indicate that a good weather window is imminent for the coming week, so they may well take their time before heading back up. They'll travel by helicopter once again as well, so it is possible that the conditions could delay the flight too. Still, Alex and company are as determined as ever to reach the summit, so look for them to be back on the mountain as soon as possible.

As I write this, there is exactly one month left in the winter season. That is plenty of time to still make the ascent as Alex has envisioned it, which is without the use of bottled oxygen. But, the expedition has taken its toll. Living on the mountain for six weeks has been a challenge, with brutal weather conditions at times. Worse yet, the Spanish climber says that he has lost 12 kg (26.4 pounds) so far, which isn't great for his overall health either.

We'll keep an eye on the team's progress and post updates as warranted. Right now, the next step is just getting back on the mountain. From there, we'll have to wait to see what happens.